I have a new home plastic/fiberglass shower stall with a glass door and side panel. Two side are the plastic and it is probably 8' tall. I do not want to enlarge it at all. I want to just replace. It is like an inset that was there when we built the house. Not fancy. It is a white/cream color and I would just like something nicer to replace it. Anyone intrested in the Spring, Texas area.
I just renovated a 6X12 bathroom. Old cast iron tub removed. Removed and saved existing vanity and vanity top. Removed the toilet and replaced the existing rotten flooring and added on to the existing partially rotten floor joist. Removed the drywall and tile from around the old tub. After the new flooring was in I had to modify the existing plumbing to accommodate the new tub and shower surround. The hot and cold water lines had to be raised to fit the surround because the new tub is taller and the drains had to be installed and moved to fit the new tub. Drywall was finished and painted. New faucets,New tub,Tub Surround, and flooring materials were purchased by the home owner. Labor cost was 4,584.00
Once your new materials have arrived, the tearout begins. This involves removing everything from your bathroom right down to the studs. At this point in time, if there are issues with water leaks or mold, they can be addressed. It is at this stage that hidden issues are usually uncovered. Keep in mind that issues can dramatically impact your costs, depending on what is found. For example, mold remediation starts at $500 and water damage can cost as much as $2,700.
If someone was to come at us with their own additional contract, we would probably decide that we had given them enough of our time and move on. As Nick mentions below, the contractors reputation is the one on the line. They have every reason to do right by you. The crooks of the world generally don't have a reputation to stand on, and as a customer it is your job to research who you are hiring. If you can't find anything about them, they probably aren't who you want to be dealing with. If they ask for money upfront, they probably aren't running a stable outfit. We never take a penny upfront. We collect when the job is fully complete even when we are working on weeks long projects.
Top that with contractors that don’t even provide a drawings, plans or official documentation of their intent and we can see where their seemingly in control of the market. Their swagger is even more overloaded when they’re excited to come view your home yet can’t call you back week after week months later because they’re too busy to even consider your meager $30-50k one-room remodel.
I have a new home plastic/fiberglass shower stall with a glass door and side panel. Two side are the plastic and it is probably 8' tall. I do not want to enlarge it at all. I want to just replace. It is like an inset that was there when we built the house. Not fancy. It is a white/cream color and I would just like something nicer to replace it. Anyone intrested in the Spring, Texas area.
As you might imagine, I once had to sue a contractor. He demanded payments up front during different stages of work replacing a roof and front porch on my house. When he wanted to cheap out and use inferior materials, i insisted he do the job to specifications I had provided to him in writing beforehand. He walked away from the job, half completed, and I had to hire someone else to finish it. I recovered most, but not all, of the money he had stolen.
New to this site. My first thought is to the "DIY throw a bathroom together in a weekend" comment makers. Your comments about how much it cost you 2,000 to do a bathroom in your home correctly or incorrectly without a picture of the finished product is invalid in this forum. I had a customer spend 2k on a complete vanity, dumb comment. Second, I've agreed to the home owner supplying all the materials (one time mistake) and it was a total disaster after getting into the project. We know what we need when we go for supplies....plain and simple. A homeowner that purchases materials for a remodel they CAN'T handle for a contractor that CAN complete the task is like a mechanic ordering a transmission for a rear brake job....irresponsible. A good contractor listens to his customers, is given a budget, and decides if it is profitable for his company. If we give you a $7,000 price for a bathroom and you think it should be done for $5,000, I encourage the customer to get 2 more bids. I have faith in the quality of work I do, and if the customer doesn't see that from the very beginning, the transaction will be a nightmare. "JOE" your comment stuck out because its the unseen labor hours of modifying the old to fit the new that customers don't and will not ever understand. If you want something done right in your beautiful home, have the money set aside and then hire a contractor you trust to make your happy.
Top that with contractors that don’t even provide a drawings, plans or official documentation of their intent and we can see where their seemingly in control of the market. Their swagger is even more overloaded when they’re excited to come view your home yet can’t call you back week after week months later because they’re too busy to even consider your meager $30-50k one-room remodel.
While it's easy to replace a light or faucet at a later date, you should have your contractor do the larger tasks at the same time. If you plan to replace the tub and install tile floor, it's best to do that all at once. You may save on labor charges if they can do a few tasks in one day instead of doing these tasks on separate days a few months apart.
Once your new materials have arrived, the tearout begins. This involves removing everything from your bathroom right down to the studs. At this point in time, if there are issues with water leaks or mold, they can be addressed. It is at this stage that hidden issues are usually uncovered. Keep in mind that issues can dramatically impact your costs, depending on what is found. For example, mold remediation starts at $500 and water damage can cost as much as $2,700.
The more luxurious the materials for a bathroom remodeling project, the higher your budget will be. Using marble for your counters, custom cabinetry or handpainted ceramic tiles for your new shower walls in the master bathroom will look terrific. But it will also raise your material costs considerably more than installing a laminate countertop and low-end or mid-range tiles.
I have a new home plastic/fiberglass shower stall with a glass door and side panel. Two side are the plastic and it is probably 8' tall. I do not want to enlarge it at all. I want to just replace. It is like an inset that was there when we built the house. Not fancy. It is a white/cream color and I would just like something nicer to replace it. Anyone intrested in the Spring, Texas area.
Want to save some big bucks remodeling your bathroom? Consider refinishing existing items such as your bathtub, shower, sink or tile. With refinishing, you’ll only pay a small fraction (as little as 10 percent) of the cost of replacement. Your bathroom won’t be torn up for weeks, you'll avoid the big renovation mess and you’ve put one less big ol’ tub in the landfill
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