Ventilation. Ventilation. Ventilation. Moisture is your bathroom’s greatest enemy. Mold and mildew will make quick work of any renovation you’ve done so be sure to install a vent fan of appropriate CFMs for the square footage of your bathroom. The rough guide is one CFM per square foot for bathrooms of one hundred square feet or smaller. New designs are quieter and more stylish than ever and are a must have for any bathroom remodel.
Having an onsite dumpster should be your responsibility if it is something you are going to demand. They aren't cheap. Make suggestions or request a dumpster be included in the bid, but I would never start demanding anything when requesting proposals. They may have their own suggestions. We own a dump trailer and we bring it during demolition to handle the large debris. We have the trailer to avoid having to rent a dumpster on the job. If asked we can share this information, but if you require a dumpster instead we would have to take the time and research getting a dumpster to your house and add in costs we aren't accustomed to adding. That takes time and effort we may just not want to expend to give you a quote. Good contractors are generally very busy.
You want a company that has time for you and has long-term relationships with its subcontractors. Make sure you and your contractor have the same expectations about how often they will be onsite once the remodel or renovation kicks off. The contractor should be open with you about how long each stage of the project will take, and they should show a good understanding of what factors could potentially push that timeline out.
What time does the work day start and end? Do workers clean up at the end of every day? Will they haul off garbage and debris? If pros are working inside, ask how they'll protect your hardwood floors from damage. It's best to talk about all of this upfront and get it in writing. And don't just take their word for it — make sure to read their previous reviews carefully to see what other homeowners have said about their working style.
I have a miserably small master bath with a particle board subfloor (house built 1969), so I must guy it. I bought toilet made for small bathrooms, and plan to pull the cabinet sink, replace with pedestal, raise storage like lighted bulkhead, demolish tile, and widen doorway from 28" to 32". I might gain 6" from tile removal alone, plus but another 6" on entrance with cabinet sink removal. Since large expense is in demolition, I could do that. But, install showers is tricky given the drain leveling so I'll hire a pro for that. Question: gutting, updating and repairing master bath is necessary, but to what extent should I go i, terms of resizing, which would entail bumping out wall into adjoining small room, which then adds expense of finishing that where window placement restricts encroachment. It's a nice older brick house that I bought before I realized the made of lapses and oversights by the home inspector (who also is a local top police official in a town with highly subjective law enforcement). I need to fix, list, well and leave. Any thoughts (and prayers much appreciated).
When you use a bold accessory like an animal skin, you need to make sure that it isn't lost in a bunch of other decor elements. This bathroom uses its neutral, modern design to really give space to the zebra skin rug here. And the great thing about this kind of design is that you can change this one decor element as often as you wish, without having to spend thousands remodeling every time.
Most bathroom remodels will include some degree of layout or planning. Small bathrooms can be planned by a contractor, but larger rooms should involve the work of a bathroom designer to help make the most of the space. This service typically costs between $1,400 and $4,000, and in some cases, the costs can be recouped during the renovation, as designers can help you save money in other areas. This phase of the project generally includes not only planning, but also drawings, and the selection of the materials that you want to go into the room. The time frame for this phase can last several weeks depending on layout and what you ultimately want the room to look like.
My bathroom is about 8X8. Received a quote for 17,000.00 just for labor only. Granted they would be gutting entire bathroom. Also plumbing fixtures will be in same place accept toilet moved 4"inches to the left. Air tub will replace current cast iron tub -no separate shower. My material cost will be about 9500.00 . They want half of the labor cost upfront ($8500.00 Demo will be done in one day and I must pay for dumpster. My home is worth about $200K This bathroom will cost a total of approximately $26K Is this a reasonable quote and I this too much overall to spend based on home resale?
20% labor price ---out of the question----I'm a Building Contractor, If you are totally remodeling a bathroom, where is the cost for demo of existing???? Demo can easily run an extra 10%- factors: 1) Age of existing---many factors here to adjust price, 2) Accessibility ---Getting materials out of and to the bathroom, and protecting present surroundings of owner. 3) Cost to dispose of debris 4) Where is the Contractor's O & P ???
I acted as general contractor and did all my own demo to remodel my 6x8 bathroom. I hired subs individually to do most of the work - an electrician, a plumber, a drywall guy and a tile guy. I painted the walls and the ceiling. I replaced everything except the cast iron tub. Materials and fixtures cost around $2000 and labor was about $3000. My subs had no problem with me supplying the materials, because I discussed their job scope in advance. This project took 6 months but I did have another full bath to use in the mean time.
I have been trying to find an honest contractor to do 1) tar roof vent pipes on a good roof 2) remodel my small 6'x8' bathroom. I was so shocked at what these 'devil people' came up with. The roof guy said he wants $1100 to repair some caulking around vent pipes and fix 6 nails that popped. I told him to try somewhere else and bough my own 24 foot ladder!! The bathroom contractors were worse. I had 3 estimates - first guy wanted already $500 just to come up with a design and it was NOT REFUNDABLE if we did not go with him. I showed him the door. THe next guy asked us to come to his showroom and he was not prepared at all. He did not know how to use the computer to show us details of his/our ideas, but came with a breakdown of items in the bathroom we could buy. He then came ups with a price of $25000!! After doing research, I see such a small bathroom with simple tile and small vanity, new toilet and replace already standing shower with tile and glass door cost max. $18000 in southern California where people earn double in Virginia. This $18000 makeover was absolutely gorgeous and in a huge bathroom with tub, shower and dressing room!! The third contractor came up with the price of $17,000. This was still way over what it should cost because the bathroom is SO SMALL that two people can not fit in there. What is happening to this USA? Because of the crisis back in 2008/2009, these contractors have all become ripoff artists and make the world what it is today.....how about honesty and kindness. This behavior is a vicious circle and will come back to all one day. Beware.

And then the apples to bananas procedure of reviewing non-like proposals is just as frustrating. Some bring everything. From the paint to the tile to the fixtures and cabinetry. Others point you in you’re own direction for each of these and expect you to know what questions to ask when buying never-before, behind the scenes purchases that are required for a bathroom remodel. And you’re expected to review the costs a la carte vs as a package and come to a whole conclusion as soon as possible ‘cause if you want the remodel done in 5 months, we have to start in 3 and we’re booked for the next 6...wait, what??!?!?

While it's easy to replace a light or faucet at a later date, you should have your contractor do the larger tasks at the same time. If you plan to replace the tub and install tile floor, it's best to do that all at once. You may save on labor charges if they can do a few tasks in one day instead of doing these tasks on separate days a few months apart.

My suggestion is when talking to contractor be subtle and ask your questions. Ask if he/she will have a dumpster or trailer to haul away debris. If the don't get dumpster or have a trailer then you probably don't want them to work on your home. Tell them your concern with the only toilet in the house. Unless it is not safe I have always reinstalled the toilet so it could be used at night. A good contractor will work with you in anyway possible because you are the key to more business.
As the home owner, I am providing about $8,000 in materials. This includes the cabinetry, fixtures, faucets, countertops, lighting, toilet, glass in-line shower door and tile. Received two quotes. One contractor wants $25,000 to demo the bathroom, convert the existing tub to a tiled walk-in shower, tile the floor, and install my materials. The other wants $27,000. Using the previously mentioned 60/40 labor to material rate, I would be paying more than double for labor...that's insane. Some contractor's need a reality check.
New to this site. My first thought is to the "DIY throw a bathroom together in a weekend" comment makers. Your comments about how much it cost you 2,000 to do a bathroom in your home correctly or incorrectly without a picture of the finished product is invalid in this forum. I had a customer spend 2k on a complete vanity, dumb comment. Second, I've agreed to the home owner supplying all the materials (one time mistake) and it was a total disaster after getting into the project. We know what we need when we go for supplies....plain and simple. A homeowner that purchases materials for a remodel they CAN'T handle for a contractor that CAN complete the task is like a mechanic ordering a transmission for a rear brake job....irresponsible. A good contractor listens to his customers, is given a budget, and decides if it is profitable for his company. If we give you a $7,000 price for a bathroom and you think it should be done for $5,000, I encourage the customer to get 2 more bids. I have faith in the quality of work I do, and if the customer doesn't see that from the very beginning, the transaction will be a nightmare. "JOE" your comment stuck out because its the unseen labor hours of modifying the old to fit the new that customers don't and will not ever understand. If you want something done right in your beautiful home, have the money set aside and then hire a contractor you trust to make your happy.
When you use a bold accessory like an animal skin, you need to make sure that it isn't lost in a bunch of other decor elements. This bathroom uses its neutral, modern design to really give space to the zebra skin rug here. And the great thing about this kind of design is that you can change this one decor element as often as you wish, without having to spend thousands remodeling every time.
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