Be brutally honest about your DIY skill level. Assess which projects to do yourself and which are better left to the pros. You could save yourself a ton of money in the long run if you don’t have to call someone in to fix a project you’ve messed up. The best way to find a good contractor — seek referrals from friends, family, neighbors, co-workers and others who have had remodeling work done.
I acted as general contractor and did all my own demo to remodel my 6x8 bathroom. I hired subs individually to do most of the work - an electrician, a plumber, a drywall guy and a tile guy. I painted the walls and the ceiling. I replaced everything except the cast iron tub. Materials and fixtures cost around $2000 and labor was about $3000. My subs had no problem with me supplying the materials, because I discussed their job scope in advance. This project took 6 months but I did have another full bath to use in the mean time.

If you’re suffering from sticker shock, don’t worry. Bathroom remodeling isn’t all or nothing. You can cut down on bathroom remodel costs by going one step at a time. A bathroom can still benefit from new lighting or ventilation updates followed by a new bathroom vanity or granite countertops. You can always upgrade some features later down the road.
My suggestion is when talking to contractor be subtle and ask your questions. Ask if he/she will have a dumpster or trailer to haul away debris. If the don't get dumpster or have a trailer then you probably don't want them to work on your home. Tell them your concern with the only toilet in the house. Unless it is not safe I have always reinstalled the toilet so it could be used at night. A good contractor will work with you in anyway possible because you are the key to more business.
There are so many beautiful things to notice about this bathroom that it's hard to know where to start. The concrete sink? The wallpaper? The sconce lighting? The tarnished mirror on the door, reflected in the main mirror? The barely-there ultra-modern faucets? Whatever you notice first, though, you can't but admit that this space is a masterpiece.
The things that may scare someone away is agreeing on cost and deadline before they could know what they are getting into. The last thing they want is for this job to cost them money. I think a good way to talk about deadline and reimbursement it to tell them your concerns. Be honest, tell them it is costing you time and money having to shower somewhere else. Ask them if it would be possible to be reimbursed if it goes over deadline. If they agree put it in contract. What I think the trick is, is to bring up the topic and let it be their idea or have them agree to an idea rather than coming to them with something seeming like demands. Offer a drink or something, seem friendly and easy to work with. Kindness goes a long way. Their reputation is on the line not yours.
We’ve had a number of contractors to our house for a number of items from roof tear off & redo, to gutters and corner boards, whole-house carpet replacement and a basement completion. We know the lingo and the big picture but - whether it’s the timing or the unknown - this has been the most frustrating process ever! If you find a nuts & bolts, studs to baseboards and crown-molding to carpet contractor you can trust, consider yourself one of the lucky 10 across the country. The rest of us are stuck in the wild-west and unfortunately left with an article that’s not even worth updating over the past 2+ years.
Don’t want your budget to skyrocket? Don't move your plumbing. On the surface, switching your sink and toilet around may look easy enough, but the problem lies underneath and all the costs involved in moving that plumbing. Besides, if you spend less money on moving fixtures, you’ll have more to spend on that new sleek shower system or vanity you’ve been eyeing.
It's totally legitimate for a professional to charge you for a design, at least in some situations. If the contractor has a book of ready-made designs and just pulled one out to show you, then you're right that s/he shouldn't charge you. But if someone does a design that conforms to your room's dimensions, with the features that you want, then that person has invested time in creating a work product. Some contractors and architects think that's just the cost of doing business, but many others consider that their time is worth something, and they charge for it. You just need to let contractors know that you're not looking for that kind of custom work, and not willing to pay for it.
The average bathroom remodel costs $10,446 Most homeowners spend between $5,977 and $14,926. You can spend as little as $3,500 to $7,000 updating the essentials in a small or medium-sized bathroom. On a large or master bath, you could spend $25,000 or more. Labor averages 50 percent of the total project price at about $65 per hour. Expect pricing to vary regionally up to 20 percent due mainly to labor. Material prices stay roughly the same across the country.
Going "green" is not only good for the environment; it’s also good for you. Green products have great design, tend to function better, which lowers utility bills, and they’re also chemical-free, making them better for your health. Having an eco-friendly approach to remodeling isn’t just about buying new products, doing something "green" can be as simple as painting a cabinet instead of tossing it in a landfill.
Be brutally honest about your DIY skill level. Assess which projects to do yourself and which are better left to the pros. You could save yourself a ton of money in the long run if you don’t have to call someone in to fix a project you’ve messed up. The best way to find a good contractor — seek referrals from friends, family, neighbors, co-workers and others who have had remodeling work done.
After the tearout, the plumbing and electrical are updated throughout the room to accommodate your new layout and fixtures. Then new backer board and subflooring 1 are put in, followed by tiling, and finally the installation of fixtures, lights, and accessories. From tearout to completion is usually a two to three week timeframe. Costs for this phase of the project range from $45-$65 for a plumber to $65-$85 an hour for an electrician and $5-$10 a square foot for flooring and tile preparation.

You want a company that has time for you and has long-term relationships with its subcontractors. Make sure you and your contractor have the same expectations about how often they will be onsite once the remodel or renovation kicks off. The contractor should be open with you about how long each stage of the project will take, and they should show a good understanding of what factors could potentially push that timeline out.


Going "green" is not only good for the environment; it’s also good for you. Green products have great design, tend to function better, which lowers utility bills, and they’re also chemical-free, making them better for your health. Having an eco-friendly approach to remodeling isn’t just about buying new products, doing something "green" can be as simple as painting a cabinet instead of tossing it in a landfill.
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