A punitive approach to what could be unforseen and atypical delays may be a bad idea. I would suggest offering a bonus for the job being completed early rather than a penalty for it being delayed. If material is ordered, we can't make it arrive faster if something delays the shipment. We recently ordered a bathtub requested by a customer. It was promised by our supplier for a Wednesday delivery. Bad weather hit Texas and it just didn't leave the warehouse until the following Monday. It blew up our schedule for the project and it wasn't anyone's fault or mistake. If we have an employee critical to the project get sick or injured, we may not be able to get things done as originally scheduled. Jobs can get off schedule for a lot of reasons outside the contractor's control. Charging them for those things is likely to turn them away.
Once your new materials have arrived, the tearout begins. This involves removing everything from your bathroom right down to the studs. At this point in time, if there are issues with water leaks or mold, they can be addressed. It is at this stage that hidden issues are usually uncovered. Keep in mind that issues can dramatically impact your costs, depending on what is found. For example, mold remediation starts at $500 and water damage can cost as much as $2,700.
Ventilation. Ventilation. Ventilation. Moisture is your bathroom’s greatest enemy. Mold and mildew will make quick work of any renovation you’ve done so be sure to install a vent fan of appropriate CFMs for the square footage of your bathroom. The rough guide is one CFM per square foot for bathrooms of one hundred square feet or smaller. New designs are quieter and more stylish than ever and are a must have for any bathroom remodel.
You want a company that has time for you and has long-term relationships with its subcontractors. Make sure you and your contractor have the same expectations about how often they will be onsite once the remodel or renovation kicks off. The contractor should be open with you about how long each stage of the project will take, and they should show a good understanding of what factors could potentially push that timeline out.
The remodel is needed due to water leakage from the tub surround into the wall cavity. I recommended she get an estimate of extra costs that cannot be foreseen until demolition occurs but would be entailed if the contractor has to do any structural work like putting in new studs and or has to install new insulation. I urged her to get at least an upper ceiling estimate before work begins lest the contractor make her an offer she can't refuse once the room is gutted. I urged her to be flexible on any adjustment to the estimate that can be made only after demolition begins. But I told her to insist that the rest of the estimate be binding. No surprises.
The average cost to gut and demolish a bathroom is $400 to $2,000. Prices depend on the room size, type of materials, which fixtures are being removed, if walls are being demolished, and if any damage is found in the subflooring or inner wall structure. You can DIY to save money, but hire a professional to inspect your electrical wiring and plumbing.
Often times, people confuse the difference between a master bathroom and a powder room. A master bathroom is a large bathroom that is attached to the master bedroom in a house. It is often big in size and contains a sink, toilet, shower, and bathtub. The bathtub and shower are either together or separate. A powder room is different in that it is a small bathroom only containing a toilet and a sink. Sometimes the name powder room is interchanged with guest bathroom or half baths. Powder rooms do not contain a shower, and is usually located on the first floor of a home. The purpose of a powder room is a bathroom for guests to use without feeling as if they are intruding into your home.
The remodel is needed due to water leakage from the tub surround into the wall cavity. I recommended she get an estimate of extra costs that cannot be foreseen until demolition occurs but would be entailed if the contractor has to do any structural work like putting in new studs and or has to install new insulation. I urged her to get at least an upper ceiling estimate before work begins lest the contractor make her an offer she can't refuse once the room is gutted. I urged her to be flexible on any adjustment to the estimate that can be made only after demolition begins. But I told her to insist that the rest of the estimate be binding. No surprises.

Bathrooms traditionally have few to no natural lighting sources, so any lights that you include are important to the function of the room. Lighting helps not only with the use of the bathroom, but specific task lighting in the vanity and shower areas help enhance your experience there. Lighting for the bathroom can take several forms. The most common include:
It's so competitive out there. I am a Long Island contractor and I be realized lately that clients give you an impression when you give them there costs that you are doing something wrong. I've been in this Busines about 20 years and that avg cost is right there. Also homeowners should also realize if us contractors are using subs for our plumbing and electrical our costs are hire than the guy doing all the work himself. I only used licensed contractors for all my remodeling work.
A punitive approach to what could be unforseen and atypical delays may be a bad idea. I would suggest offering a bonus for the job being completed early rather than a penalty for it being delayed. If material is ordered, we can't make it arrive faster if something delays the shipment. We recently ordered a bathtub requested by a customer. It was promised by our supplier for a Wednesday delivery. Bad weather hit Texas and it just didn't leave the warehouse until the following Monday. It blew up our schedule for the project and it wasn't anyone's fault or mistake. If we have an employee critical to the project get sick or injured, we may not be able to get things done as originally scheduled. Jobs can get off schedule for a lot of reasons outside the contractor's control. Charging them for those things is likely to turn them away.

It's so competitive out there. I am a Long Island contractor and I be realized lately that clients give you an impression when you give them there costs that you are doing something wrong. I've been in this Busines about 20 years and that avg cost is right there. Also homeowners should also realize if us contractors are using subs for our plumbing and electrical our costs are hire than the guy doing all the work himself. I only used licensed contractors for all my remodeling work.
I just renovated a 6X12 bathroom. Old cast iron tub removed. Removed and saved existing vanity and vanity top. Removed the toilet and replaced the existing rotten flooring and added on to the existing partially rotten floor joist. Removed the drywall and tile from around the old tub. After the new flooring was in I had to modify the existing plumbing to accommodate the new tub and shower surround. The hot and cold water lines had to be raised to fit the surround because the new tub is taller and the drains had to be installed and moved to fit the new tub. Drywall was finished and painted. New faucets,New tub,Tub Surround, and flooring materials were purchased by the home owner. Labor cost was 4,584.00
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