I can't even get anyone to look and give an estimate to complete a bathroom remodel- just the bathtub/shower part has to be done as the last person who was doing it died- the rest is complete and have all the items and materials already and paid for. once they hear that they are no longer intrested- what do they expect? me to let them rip out what was already done and repay and redone everything all over again so they get more money? and throw out brand new imported Travertine and Spanish tile?


The remodel is needed due to water leakage from the tub surround into the wall cavity. I recommended she get an estimate of extra costs that cannot be foreseen until demolition occurs but would be entailed if the contractor has to do any structural work like putting in new studs and or has to install new insulation. I urged her to get at least an upper ceiling estimate before work begins lest the contractor make her an offer she can't refuse once the room is gutted. I urged her to be flexible on any adjustment to the estimate that can be made only after demolition begins. But I told her to insist that the rest of the estimate be binding. No surprises.
I have a new home plastic/fiberglass shower stall with a glass door and side panel. Two side are the plastic and it is probably 8' tall. I do not want to enlarge it at all. I want to just replace. It is like an inset that was there when we built the house. Not fancy. It is a white/cream color and I would just like something nicer to replace it. Anyone intrested in the Spring, Texas area.
My suggestion is when talking to contractor be subtle and ask your questions. Ask if he/she will have a dumpster or trailer to haul away debris. If the don't get dumpster or have a trailer then you probably don't want them to work on your home. Tell them your concern with the only toilet in the house. Unless it is not safe I have always reinstalled the toilet so it could be used at night. A good contractor will work with you in anyway possible because you are the key to more business.
A punitive approach to what could be unforseen and atypical delays may be a bad idea. I would suggest offering a bonus for the job being completed early rather than a penalty for it being delayed. If material is ordered, we can't make it arrive faster if something delays the shipment. We recently ordered a bathtub requested by a customer. It was promised by our supplier for a Wednesday delivery. Bad weather hit Texas and it just didn't leave the warehouse until the following Monday. It blew up our schedule for the project and it wasn't anyone's fault or mistake. If we have an employee critical to the project get sick or injured, we may not be able to get things done as originally scheduled. Jobs can get off schedule for a lot of reasons outside the contractor's control. Charging them for those things is likely to turn them away.
The average cost to gut and demolish a bathroom is $400 to $2,000. Prices depend on the room size, type of materials, which fixtures are being removed, if walls are being demolished, and if any damage is found in the subflooring or inner wall structure. You can DIY to save money, but hire a professional to inspect your electrical wiring and plumbing.
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Going "green" is not only good for the environment; it’s also good for you. Green products have great design, tend to function better, which lowers utility bills, and they’re also chemical-free, making them better for your health. Having an eco-friendly approach to remodeling isn’t just about buying new products, doing something "green" can be as simple as painting a cabinet instead of tossing it in a landfill.
My suggestion is when talking to contractor be subtle and ask your questions. Ask if he/she will have a dumpster or trailer to haul away debris. If the don't get dumpster or have a trailer then you probably don't want them to work on your home. Tell them your concern with the only toilet in the house. Unless it is not safe I have always reinstalled the toilet so it could be used at night. A good contractor will work with you in anyway possible because you are the key to more business.
Wall and Floor Tile: Ceramic, porcelain and natural stone are popular picks for floor tile in bathrooms. Materials will be the deciding factor here, but natural stone often costs more to install because it is difficult to cut and place. From natural stone and classic ceramic to glass and mosaic styles that mimic natural materials, wall tile options vary.
I agree with everything you said. I think the trick is to convey those concerns when discussing what work will be needed. Everyone will have concerns but if you come across as too needy or pushy they may think you will be a pain in the butt homeowner. I have seen this before where you have to come back 3 or 4 times for something not dealing with the work, but you are trying to be polite and helpful for business. Word of mouth is the best way to get more buisness, in my opinion.

Bathroom remodels provide 60 to 70 percent resale returns as a home improvement project. However, this project isn’t cheap. It is essential to plan your remodeling ideas ahead of time. Then, hire a remodeling contractor for the job. Ask questions, set realistic expectations, get accurate cost estimates and budgeting from the start. Also spend time learning how to work with a bathroom contractor.

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