The things that may scare someone away is agreeing on cost and deadline before they could know what they are getting into. The last thing they want is for this job to cost them money. I think a good way to talk about deadline and reimbursement it to tell them your concerns. Be honest, tell them it is costing you time and money having to shower somewhere else. Ask them if it would be possible to be reimbursed if it goes over deadline. If they agree put it in contract. What I think the trick is, is to bring up the topic and let it be their idea or have them agree to an idea rather than coming to them with something seeming like demands. Offer a drink or something, seem friendly and easy to work with. Kindness goes a long way. Their reputation is on the line not yours.


The things that may scare someone away is agreeing on cost and deadline before they could know what they are getting into. The last thing they want is for this job to cost them money. I think a good way to talk about deadline and reimbursement it to tell them your concerns. Be honest, tell them it is costing you time and money having to shower somewhere else. Ask them if it would be possible to be reimbursed if it goes over deadline. If they agree put it in contract. What I think the trick is, is to bring up the topic and let it be their idea or have them agree to an idea rather than coming to them with something seeming like demands. Offer a drink or something, seem friendly and easy to work with. Kindness goes a long way. Their reputation is on the line not yours.
The things that may scare someone away is agreeing on cost and deadline before they could know what they are getting into. The last thing they want is for this job to cost them money. I think a good way to talk about deadline and reimbursement it to tell them your concerns. Be honest, tell them it is costing you time and money having to shower somewhere else. Ask them if it would be possible to be reimbursed if it goes over deadline. If they agree put it in contract. What I think the trick is, is to bring up the topic and let it be their idea or have them agree to an idea rather than coming to them with something seeming like demands. Offer a drink or something, seem friendly and easy to work with. Kindness goes a long way. Their reputation is on the line not yours.
The best place to start with any remodeling project is the budget. Not only will it have a big impact on the type of materials you select for your bathroom renovation, it will also help you set the boundaries of your design. Knowing what you can really afford to spend will make it a lot easier to decide what items you want to replace and where you need to get creative!
I have a new home plastic/fiberglass shower stall with a glass door and side panel. Two side are the plastic and it is probably 8' tall. I do not want to enlarge it at all. I want to just replace. It is like an inset that was there when we built the house. Not fancy. It is a white/cream color and I would just like something nicer to replace it. Anyone intrested in the Spring, Texas area.

Once your new materials have arrived, the tearout begins. This involves removing everything from your bathroom right down to the studs. At this point in time, if there are issues with water leaks or mold, they can be addressed. It is at this stage that hidden issues are usually uncovered. Keep in mind that issues can dramatically impact your costs, depending on what is found. For example, mold remediation starts at $500 and water damage can cost as much as $2,700.
Interior bathroom demolition costs $1,000 to $2,300. Prices can go higher if you’re removing and moving walls to create a different footprint. For the experienced DIYer, this is a good place to save money by doing it yourself or assisting the contractor. However, demo can get expensive quickly if you take out a load bearing wall, cut electrical lines or break a water pipe. Avoid the risk by hiring a pro.

You want a company that has time for you and has long-term relationships with its subcontractors. Make sure you and your contractor have the same expectations about how often they will be onsite once the remodel or renovation kicks off. The contractor should be open with you about how long each stage of the project will take, and they should show a good understanding of what factors could potentially push that timeline out.


After the tearout, the plumbing and electrical are updated throughout the room to accommodate your new layout and fixtures. Then new backer board and subflooring 1 are put in, followed by tiling, and finally the installation of fixtures, lights, and accessories. From tearout to completion is usually a two to three week timeframe. Costs for this phase of the project range from $45-$65 for a plumber to $65-$85 an hour for an electrician and $5-$10 a square foot for flooring and tile preparation.
Bathroom remodels provide 60 to 70 percent resale returns as a home improvement project. However, this project isn’t cheap. It is essential to plan your remodeling ideas ahead of time. Then, hire a remodeling contractor for the job. Ask questions, set realistic expectations, get accurate cost estimates and budgeting from the start. Also spend time learning how to work with a bathroom contractor.
You want a company that has time for you and has long-term relationships with its subcontractors. Make sure you and your contractor have the same expectations about how often they will be onsite once the remodel or renovation kicks off. The contractor should be open with you about how long each stage of the project will take, and they should show a good understanding of what factors could potentially push that timeline out.
As you might imagine, I once had to sue a contractor. He demanded payments up front during different stages of work replacing a roof and front porch on my house. When he wanted to cheap out and use inferior materials, i insisted he do the job to specifications I had provided to him in writing beforehand. He walked away from the job, half completed, and I had to hire someone else to finish it. I recovered most, but not all, of the money he had stolen.
This estimate for a 2019 Typical Bathroom Remodel is derived from the unit cost method summarized in the American Institute of Architects Detailed Cost Estimating - Best Practices. This approach is used by professional designers, contractors, engineers and estimators and uses current wages, material costs, worker productivity benchmarks, supervisory overhead and markup rates.
The Home Depot is a great place to buy your bathroom essentials and remodeling materials. We also provide top-rated design and installation services for homeowners across America. Besides undergoing full background checks, our hand-selected remodeling experts are local, licensed and insured. The Home Depot also offers a great selection of flexible finance options.

As I contractor if I am installing a customers product or supplying my own, I am charging full overhead and profit above the install cost. I try not to allow customers to supply materials and when they do I tack on my overhead and profit in to the labor. Remodeling is one of the most time consuming services and if your not covering your overhead and profit in the materials and labor you will not last long in this business. At the end of the day after all said and done, making a 15% profit is respectable. Think about it, your the designer, the gofer, the physiatrist, the builder, shopper and the banker until you get paid. Never be intimidated to support your price, deliver a quality product and support it with proper pricing. Never let the customer supply there own materials. Movie theaters don't let you bring in your own pop corn, so why should contractors be any different.
Remodeling your bathroom might seem like a complex task, but proper planning can help you get the look and feel you want for your home. Use this guide to learn more about the benefits of remodeling your powder room, guest bathroom or master bathroom space. Typically, bathroom remodels start at $5,000 and can vary based on the size of your room and the products you choose to update.
The average cost to gut and demolish a bathroom is $400 to $2,000. Prices depend on the room size, type of materials, which fixtures are being removed, if walls are being demolished, and if any damage is found in the subflooring or inner wall structure. You can DIY to save money, but hire a professional to inspect your electrical wiring and plumbing.
To give you more of an idea of what you'll pay before a contractor gives you an estimate, here are several cost examples for remodels of different size bathrooms, provided by Thumbtack Pro Viewpoint NW, a bathroom remodeler in Vancouver, Washington. Keep in mind each job was specific to that house. The total cost of each project includes all material and labor costs:
Both Lowe’s and Home Depot offer bathroom remodeling services. Home Depot remodels cost $5,000 for a powder room up to $30,000 for a master bathroom remodel. Lowe’s suggests that customers expect to pay at least $100 per square foot on bathroom remodels. Both stores offer repairs on your existing fixtures and installing upgrades or new replacement parts.
It's becoming increasingly popular to purchase custom items for the home, including the bathroom. While not everything can be made to order, custom cabinetry can help you make the most of the space. This type of work can typically cost significantly more than readymade and can take approximately 12 weeks to complete. Carpenters typically charge at least $70 an hour for built-ins 7, while can raise the cost of things like cabinetry to $2,000 per cabinet, with many bathrooms using a minimum of 3 or more.
Home Stratosphere is an award-winning home and garden online publication that’s a result of our talented researchers and writers who work directly with hundreds of professional interior designers, furniture designers, landscape designers and architects from around the world to create helpful, informative, entertaining and inspiring articles and design galleries.
This estimate for a 2019 Typical Bathroom Remodel is derived from the unit cost method summarized in the American Institute of Architects Detailed Cost Estimating - Best Practices. This approach is used by professional designers, contractors, engineers and estimators and uses current wages, material costs, worker productivity benchmarks, supervisory overhead and markup rates.

With this article being close to 2 years old, I can easily say it is WAAAAYYYY out of date and couldn’t be farther from current outcomes. While some of the occurrences with the difficulty in getting responses from contractors might still be the same, the dollar figures are multiples off! My wife and I have been researching a modest renovation on our master bath (mid70’s colonial MB that was updated once before) and have reached out to multiple contractors over that timeframe. Each time, our revelation into the exhorbitant costs are proof enough we’re not asking either the right questions or the right contractors. The dissapointment in hearing the $30k minimum and 45$k midpoint (again...midpoint) for our studs to simple remodel are enough to send us into the nether-regions of misunderstanding and annoyance and the same time.
Unless specified in Project Options list, this typical bathroom remodel estimate does NOT include costs for relocating, repairing, modifying or enhancing existing structural, HVAC, electrical and plumbing systems. Estimate common structural and system modification costs with the Room Modifications Cost estimator or the Home Addition Cost estimator.

The things that may scare someone away is agreeing on cost and deadline before they could know what they are getting into. The last thing they want is for this job to cost them money. I think a good way to talk about deadline and reimbursement it to tell them your concerns. Be honest, tell them it is costing you time and money having to shower somewhere else. Ask them if it would be possible to be reimbursed if it goes over deadline. If they agree put it in contract. What I think the trick is, is to bring up the topic and let it be their idea or have them agree to an idea rather than coming to them with something seeming like demands. Offer a drink or something, seem friendly and easy to work with. Kindness goes a long way. Their reputation is on the line not yours.


My suggestion is when talking to contractor be subtle and ask your questions. Ask if he/she will have a dumpster or trailer to haul away debris. If the don't get dumpster or have a trailer then you probably don't want them to work on your home. Tell them your concern with the only toilet in the house. Unless it is not safe I have always reinstalled the toilet so it could be used at night. A good contractor will work with you in anyway possible because you are the key to more business.
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