Ventilation. Ventilation. Ventilation. Moisture is your bathroom’s greatest enemy. Mold and mildew will make quick work of any renovation you’ve done so be sure to install a vent fan of appropriate CFMs for the square footage of your bathroom. The rough guide is one CFM per square foot for bathrooms of one hundred square feet or smaller. New designs are quieter and more stylish than ever and are a must have for any bathroom remodel.

We own a kitchen and bath company. If you are going to do the work yourself, you will save money....if you act as the GC, that is great as long as you have the time to manage the project. If you are using a guy out of his truck, the job will be less expensive. BUT check their references and insurance. WE run a legitimate business and a showroom. We are not inexpensive but are not high priced. YOU MUST have realistic expectations of what things cost, both in material and labor costs. We pull permits also....all this costs money. We have 30 years in business. Do not expect a full demo of a bathroom to be $11,000 in CT. If someone gives you a price like that RUN, it is too good to be true. You are looking at 18,000 and up. Cheaper does not mean better. If you are buying all the materials at HD or Lowes, good luck. You will redo your space one more time before you move. Spend a little more on a good, experienced contractor now....in the end it will be worth it.
The best place to start with any remodeling project is the budget. Not only will it have a big impact on the type of materials you select for your bathroom renovation, it will also help you set the boundaries of your design. Knowing what you can really afford to spend will make it a lot easier to decide what items you want to replace and where you need to get creative!

It's so competitive out there. I am a Long Island contractor and I be realized lately that clients give you an impression when you give them there costs that you are doing something wrong. I've been in this Busines about 20 years and that avg cost is right there. Also homeowners should also realize if us contractors are using subs for our plumbing and electrical our costs are hire than the guy doing all the work himself. I only used licensed contractors for all my remodeling work.


I agree with everything you said. I think the trick is to convey those concerns when discussing what work will be needed. Everyone will have concerns but if you come across as too needy or pushy they may think you will be a pain in the butt homeowner. I have seen this before where you have to come back 3 or 4 times for something not dealing with the work, but you are trying to be polite and helpful for business. Word of mouth is the best way to get more buisness, in my opinion.
The things that may scare someone away is agreeing on cost and deadline before they could know what they are getting into. The last thing they want is for this job to cost them money. I think a good way to talk about deadline and reimbursement it to tell them your concerns. Be honest, tell them it is costing you time and money having to shower somewhere else. Ask them if it would be possible to be reimbursed if it goes over deadline. If they agree put it in contract. What I think the trick is, is to bring up the topic and let it be their idea or have them agree to an idea rather than coming to them with something seeming like demands. Offer a drink or something, seem friendly and easy to work with. Kindness goes a long way. Their reputation is on the line not yours.
Wall and Floor Tile: Ceramic, porcelain and natural stone are popular picks for floor tile in bathrooms. Materials will be the deciding factor here, but natural stone often costs more to install because it is difficult to cut and place. From natural stone and classic ceramic to glass and mosaic styles that mimic natural materials, wall tile options vary.
If you’re suffering from sticker shock, don’t worry. Bathroom remodeling isn’t all or nothing. You can cut down on bathroom remodel costs by going one step at a time. A bathroom can still benefit from new lighting or ventilation updates followed by a new bathroom vanity or granite countertops. You can always upgrade some features later down the road.

Bathrooms traditionally have few to no natural lighting sources, so any lights that you include are important to the function of the room. Lighting helps not only with the use of the bathroom, but specific task lighting in the vanity and shower areas help enhance your experience there. Lighting for the bathroom can take several forms. The most common include:

After the tearout, the plumbing and electrical are updated throughout the room to accommodate your new layout and fixtures. Then new backer board and subflooring 1 are put in, followed by tiling, and finally the installation of fixtures, lights, and accessories. From tearout to completion is usually a two to three week timeframe. Costs for this phase of the project range from $45-$65 for a plumber to $65-$85 an hour for an electrician and $5-$10 a square foot for flooring and tile preparation.
I can't even get anyone to look and give an estimate to complete a bathroom remodel- just the bathtub/shower part has to be done as the last person who was doing it died- the rest is complete and have all the items and materials already and paid for. once they hear that they are no longer intrested- what do they expect? me to let them rip out what was already done and repay and redone everything all over again so they get more money? and throw out brand new imported Travertine and Spanish tile?
As a contractor I can tell you that most reputable contractors probably don't need your job, and if you make things too complicated or troublesome, they will move on to other jobs that don't throw up red flags. Much of what you ask for here is reasonable, but bringing a second contract into the equation can set of some alarms that you may be a difficult customer to work with or even a litigiously minded person who is likely to try and bring a lawsuit whether deserved or not. Anything you want covered should be in the original contract.

After the tearout, the plumbing and electrical are updated throughout the room to accommodate your new layout and fixtures. Then new backer board and subflooring 1 are put in, followed by tiling, and finally the installation of fixtures, lights, and accessories. From tearout to completion is usually a two to three week timeframe. Costs for this phase of the project range from $45-$65 for a plumber to $65-$85 an hour for an electrician and $5-$10 a square foot for flooring and tile preparation.

There are so many beautiful things to notice about this bathroom that it's hard to know where to start. The concrete sink? The wallpaper? The sconce lighting? The tarnished mirror on the door, reflected in the main mirror? The barely-there ultra-modern faucets? Whatever you notice first, though, you can't but admit that this space is a masterpiece.
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