The angles where any two planes meet in a wet area, such as the shower, tub, and countertop need to be filled with a flexible material to absorb movement and seal up this section to keep it watertight. This is usually done with some form of caulk 6, either latex or silicone. A tube of caulk 6 costs around $20 and this is usually installed with the tile, shower, or counter with the cost included in the tiling.

Yeah, I feel your pain. I'm in Alabama, one of the lowest income states in the country, and I got a quote from a "big box" hardware store here. $39,000 -- to remodel a 9 x 12 bathroom. I won't go into the details but I'll tell you that the estimate included $3600 for electrical work. Uhh, we are simply switching out 2 'regular' outlets and putting in $20-dollar GFI outlets. The wiring is fine (I know because I've been in the wall before). So don't go to the "big box" stores unless you want the highest possible estimate (oh, yeah ... I had to pay for the estimate as well).
A punitive approach to what could be unforseen and atypical delays may be a bad idea. I would suggest offering a bonus for the job being completed early rather than a penalty for it being delayed. If material is ordered, we can't make it arrive faster if something delays the shipment. We recently ordered a bathtub requested by a customer. It was promised by our supplier for a Wednesday delivery. Bad weather hit Texas and it just didn't leave the warehouse until the following Monday. It blew up our schedule for the project and it wasn't anyone's fault or mistake. If we have an employee critical to the project get sick or injured, we may not be able to get things done as originally scheduled. Jobs can get off schedule for a lot of reasons outside the contractor's control. Charging them for those things is likely to turn them away.
Yeah, I feel your pain. I'm in Alabama, one of the lowest income states in the country, and I got a quote from a "big box" hardware store here. $39,000 -- to remodel a 9 x 12 bathroom. I won't go into the details but I'll tell you that the estimate included $3600 for electrical work. Uhh, we are simply switching out 2 'regular' outlets and putting in $20-dollar GFI outlets. The wiring is fine (I know because I've been in the wall before). So don't go to the "big box" stores unless you want the highest possible estimate (oh, yeah ... I had to pay for the estimate as well).
Toilets are also integral to the bathroom. They come in three standard rough-in sizes, with 12-inches being standard and costing the least, and 10 or 14-inch roughs coming in fewer options. Toilets come in one or two piece options with round or elongated bowls. Toilets also come in two heights, a standard 15-inch and a taller, ADA approved 17-inch. Costs for toilets start at $100 and can go as high as $1,000 for some higher end designs.
Everyone wants to save money, but when you start by questioning material costs or markups it can indicate that you may be under budgeting for the project, or will question every choice the contractor makes in the hopes of saving $100. Time is money and when you have a customer who may cause interruptions because they want to buy something themselves to avoid "markup" it can cause major delays. Many times a customer ends up getting the wrong material anyway. This again slows down a contractor that may already be too busy.
With this article being close to 2 years old, I can easily say it is WAAAAYYYY out of date and couldn’t be farther from current outcomes. While some of the occurrences with the difficulty in getting responses from contractors might still be the same, the dollar figures are multiples off! My wife and I have been researching a modest renovation on our master bath (mid70’s colonial MB that was updated once before) and have reached out to multiple contractors over that timeframe. Each time, our revelation into the exhorbitant costs are proof enough we’re not asking either the right questions or the right contractors. The dissapointment in hearing the $30k minimum and 45$k midpoint (again...midpoint) for our studs to simple remodel are enough to send us into the nether-regions of misunderstanding and annoyance and the same time.

After the tearout, the plumbing and electrical are updated throughout the room to accommodate your new layout and fixtures. Then new backer board and subflooring 1 are put in, followed by tiling, and finally the installation of fixtures, lights, and accessories. From tearout to completion is usually a two to three week timeframe. Costs for this phase of the project range from $45-$65 for a plumber to $65-$85 an hour for an electrician and $5-$10 a square foot for flooring and tile preparation.

I acted as general contractor and did all my own demo to remodel my 6x8 bathroom. I hired subs individually to do most of the work - an electrician, a plumber, a drywall guy and a tile guy. I painted the walls and the ceiling. I replaced everything except the cast iron tub. Materials and fixtures cost around $2000 and labor was about $3000. My subs had no problem with me supplying the materials, because I discussed their job scope in advance. This project took 6 months but I did have another full bath to use in the mean time.


The cost to remodel a bathroom varies greatly. Factors like the current state of the space, the specific bathroom remodel design plans and material costs can all impact the overall price. Some bathroom remodel projects involve simple repairs and replacements in a small bathroom, whereas others require major replacements and upgrades, renovation of an entire bathroom or the addition of a whole new bathroom. So what will a bathroom remodeling contractor charge you? Let's look at the numbers.
20% labor price ---out of the question----I'm a Building Contractor, If you are totally remodeling a bathroom, where is the cost for demo of existing???? Demo can easily run an extra 10%- factors: 1) Age of existing---many factors here to adjust price, 2) Accessibility ---Getting materials out of and to the bathroom, and protecting present surroundings of owner. 3) Cost to dispose of debris 4) Where is the Contractor's O & P ???
As I contractor if I am installing a customers product or supplying my own, I am charging full overhead and profit above the install cost. I try not to allow customers to supply materials and when they do I tack on my overhead and profit in to the labor. Remodeling is one of the most time consuming services and if your not covering your overhead and profit in the materials and labor you will not last long in this business. At the end of the day after all said and done, making a 15% profit is respectable. Think about it, your the designer, the gofer, the physiatrist, the builder, shopper and the banker until you get paid. Never be intimidated to support your price, deliver a quality product and support it with proper pricing. Never let the customer supply there own materials. Movie theaters don't let you bring in your own pop corn, so why should contractors be any different.

The cost to remodel a bathroom varies greatly. Factors like the current state of the space, the specific bathroom remodel design plans and material costs can all impact the overall price. Some bathroom remodel projects involve simple repairs and replacements in a small bathroom, whereas others require major replacements and upgrades, renovation of an entire bathroom or the addition of a whole new bathroom. So what will a bathroom remodeling contractor charge you? Let's look at the numbers.
A typical bathroom remodel costs $5,000 to $15,000, with most homeowners spending $120 to $275 per square foot. A typical 5x7 bathroom remodel costs $4,200 to $9,600. Small renovations cost $2,000 to $5,000 and one-day bath or shower remodels from Rebath or Bath Planet run $4,000 to $10,000. Get free estimates from bathroom remodelers near you or view our cost guide below.
There are so many beautiful things to notice about this bathroom that it's hard to know where to start. The concrete sink? The wallpaper? The sconce lighting? The tarnished mirror on the door, reflected in the main mirror? The barely-there ultra-modern faucets? Whatever you notice first, though, you can't but admit that this space is a masterpiece.
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